Tag Archives: human nature

Forgiveness

It’s difficult to forgive – whether it’s someone we feel wronged by or even ourselves for mistakes we’ve made. Accepting what we can’t control or change leads us toward forgiveness. It doesn’t mean we forget nor condone the offenses; however, as we read in Matthew 6:14-15: 14 For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, 15 but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

Everyone deserves forgiveness – no one if perfect. People make mistakes; it’s human nature. Some people learn and strive to do better while others aren’t self-aware of their wrongdoing. It’s their nature to do whatever it takes to get what they want without concern of who they harm along the way.

Though forgiveness can help repair a damaged relationship, it doesn’t mean that you need to jump headfirst into an affiliation with the person who harmed you. When you allow forgiveness, it provides peace of mind and releases your negativity. While there is some debate over whether true forgiveness requires positive feelings toward the offender, experts agree that it at least involves letting go of deeply held negative pain. Being able to recognize the strain you suffered without letting that pain define you helps as you heal while moving forward with your life.

Forgiveness isn’t easy. What would our life be like if we learn to forgive those who have deeply hurt us? Would we inspire others to pursue forgiveness in their own lives? “Forgiveness is not an occasional act; it is a permanent attitude.” –Martin Luther King, Jr.

Colossians 3:13: Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.

Who Am I to Judge

Why are people quick to judge? We hear it every day, and we read it every day – we’re a society that’s quick to judge. Why is this so? It’s easily justified as opinion, perception or discussion regarding the situation. After all, we’re entitled to think what we want; it doesn’t hurt anyone, correct?

To judge someone else’s actions and the outcome that affects them is human nature. We’re all guilty, and without a second thought take part. Most people aren’t intentionally malicious. We find ourselves caught up in the moment, it’s a discussion with coworkers or friends, and we all have an opinion, after all, what we have to say is essential.

The other day as I read through the news, an article that had created a lot of buzz was a group of minors being caught by law enforcement with alcohol. Everywhere I went I was surprised at the various opinions people shared that knew nothing of the situation or who was involved.

The other day as I read through the news, an article that created a lot of buzz was about a group of minors being caught by law enforcement with alcohol. I was surprised at the various opinions people shared who knew nothing of the situation or who was involved. After several days of hearing stories of when others were that age, how those youngsters were only doing what teens do, and bold statements of how law enforcement doesn’t remember when they were young – I could only smile to myself.

I never once heard anyone say how maybe this was God’s way of stepping in to keep His children safe. If just if one of those youth would have been in an accident due to their intoxicated state and life was tragically lost, then the tune would have changed to where was law enforcement, and why hadn’t they stopped the teens sooner. And through all of the talk and the opinions I never once heard anyone ask where their parents were?!

Romans 2:3: Do you suppose, O man—you who judge those who practice such things and yet do them yourself—that you will escape the judgment of God?